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Hitler-themed homework assigned to middle-schoolers angers parents

Parents in a Chicago suburb are furious after their kids brought home a homework assignment called “If You Give Hitler a Country.” The assignment reportedly told the students to “create a comic strip for little kids that exemplifies Europe’s appeasement towards Hitler.”

>> Watch the news report here

At Woodland Middle School in Gurnee, Illinois, eighth-grader Michael Masterton told WGN that “everyone in the class was given the paper and it tells you all the requirements.” His mother, Kelly, was a bit more taken aback by the homework, telling the Chicago station, “I asked him, ‘Did you ask the teacher if you could use these images?’ and he said yes. … I’m not sure what the appropriate manner is to use a swastika.” The concerned mother posted the image to her Facebook page and said, “[I] don’t think [the teacher] did it to be anti-Semitic. I think she was trying to teach that there was propaganda. ... It did not come through that way.”

>> Read more trending news

On the handout, a cartoon character is shown wearing a Nazi uniform and sporting an Adolf Hitler mustache while giving a Nazi salute. Michael told NBC Chicago that he asked for an alternative assignment, saying, "Some kids were being a bit immature and trying to make this assignment a little bit funny, and it’s disgusting.”

School board president Carla Little apologized in a statement and said the assignment was aimed at teaching students about the appeasement negotiations between the Nazis and opposing countries and the events leading up to World War II. Kelly said she’s not satisfied with the school's explanation and wants to know “that they’re not going to go ahead and give more assignments and make light of it.”

Read more here.

Middle school teacher charged with sex crimes involving students

A grand jury indicted a middle school teacher in Caldwell County, North Carolina, on five felony counts of taking indecent liberties with a child.

>> Watch the news report here

WSOC-TV reporter Dave Faherty was there as authorities brought in 29-year-old Justin Biggs. 

>> Read more trending news 

Police said Biggs has resigned from his teaching position at William Lenoir Middle School.

Lenoir police said they began their investigation in November after a female middle school student reported being assaulted on school grounds. The investigation led to more students coming forward, totaling five, according to police.

>> Teacher accused of having sex with 16-year-old student in park

The indictments said Biggs, who was a math teacher and softball coach at the middle school, committed a lewd act on a child

Police said all of the incidents happened on school grounds.

"It's hard on the school and the children there,” Lenoir police Capt. Brent Phelps said. “These are tough cases."

Ohio lawmakers could mandate students learn cursive handwriting again

Some Ohio lawmakers want elementary school students to be able to print letters by the third grade and write documents in “legible cursive handwriting” by the time they finish fifth grade. The Ohio House could vote Dec. 5 on a bill to require a return of teaching cursive writing

>> Read more trending news

In February, Ohio House Education Committee Chairman Andrew Brenner, R-Powell, introduced a bill to mandate that kindergarteners through fifth-graders be instructed in handwriting.

RELATED: Cursive returns to Louisiana schools with new law

Schools have dialed back handwriting instruction to make more time for core academic requirements, such as helping struggling readers in first through third grades.

RELATED: What happened last time lawmakers tried to bring cursive back?

Cursive instruction is included in the state’s “model curriculum” for grades 3 and 4 and the State Board of Education passed a resolution in early 2014 in support of teaching cursive. But it isn’t a hard-and-fast requirement.

RELATED: Other states have mandated cursive for public schools

The same bill was introduced in 2015 but failed to pass before the two-year legislative session ended. Advocates of mandating cursive instruction say it helps hone fine motor skills, is needed for signing important records , and comes in handy when reading historical handwritten documents.

Teacher accused of having sex with 16-year-old student in park

A 28-year-old preparatory school teacher was arrested on Friday for allegedly having sex with a 16-year-old student in a park last spring, Solebury Township, Pennsylvania, police say.

>> Watch the news report here

Alyssia Marie Reddy, who taught at the Pennington School located in Pennington, New Jersey, came to the attention of police after the Solebury Township department received a report of an alleged sexual assault that took place in the park in the spring of 2017, multiple news outlets are reporting.

>> Special-education teacher accused of sex with student in her classroom

Authorities said Reddy, who currently lives near Baltimore, had sexual intercourse with the student.

She was arrested on charges of institutional sexual assault, unlawful contact with a minor, criminal use of a communication facility and corruption of a minor, according to a release issued by the Solebury Township Police Department.

The Pennington School where Reddy worked sent a letter to parents saying that it had been “recently made aware of an alleged inappropriate relationship involving a former Upper School teacher of The Pennington School in the 2016-17 school year,” according to a report by the Trentonian.

>> Former 'principal of the year' accused of sex with students

WCAU reported that Reddy gave the student her cellphone number in December of last year and that by February 2017 he was getting messages like, “I want your hands on me.”

The school also said that upon hearing the incident, it quickly made contact with the Mercer County Prosecutor’s Office.

Reddy had apparently departed from the New Jersey prep school and was employed at The St. Paul’s School for Girls located in Baltimore County. Her Facebook page said that she is a SPIRITUS Scholars Coordinator and History Teacher there.

The school terminated her employment following her arrest and banned her from the campus. It also deleted references to Reddy from its website, but a Google search showed that she was recently in the staff and faculty directory.

>> Read more trending news

“We have just learned that one of our Upper School teachers, Alyssia Reddy, who joined our faculty this year, has been charged with a felony involving sexual assault of a minor,” Head of St. Paul’s Penny B. Evans said in a letter obtained by WPMT.

“The alleged events took place in Pennsylvania this past school year with a male high school student before she came to St. Paul’s School for Girls. Before today, we had no information suggesting any prior improper conduct by Mrs. Reddy.”

On her Facebook page, Reddy has published many pictures of what appear to be her husband and two children, according to the Trentonian.

She is currently awaiting extradition to Pennsylvania.

Special-education teacher accused of sex with student in her classroom

A special-education teacher at a Butler County, Pennsylvania, school is accused of having sex with a student in the classroom

>> Watch the news report here

Police say Jordan Dominique Ondish, 23, a teacher at Summit Academy in Herman, is accused of having an inappropriate relationship with a 19-year-old student.

State police said school officials contacted them on Nov. 27 after obtaining a cellphone with sexually explicit text conversations between the victim and Ondish. She is also accused of buying the victim that cellphone, which is against school rules.

Ondish began working at the school, a rehabilitation facility for juvenile offenders, in June.

>> Former 'principal of the year' accused of sex with students

The victim told investigators he and Ondish began talking outside class, and their interaction progressed until they had sex in a classroom twice in November, investigators said. 

"State police investigated this," said Trooper Dan Kesten. "It wasn't a relationship that the two were supposed to have; this was institutional sexual assault."

Police said Ondish admitted to the relationship. School officials had previously issued a warning to her about the victim, including having the victim in her classroom after hours.

>> Read more trending news 

Summit Academy released this statement Monday afternoon.

"The administration at Summit Academy was made aware of an inappropriate relationship between a teacher and a student and it was immediately reported to the state police. The teacher was then terminated."

Troopers said Ondish told them she was in an abusive relationship at home and developed an emotional attachment to the student.

She is charged with institutional sexual assault and faces a preliminary hearing in February.

Florida man arrested, allegedly drew violent school scene on child's homework

A Florida man has been arrested and charged after authorities said he drew an image of school violence on a student’s homework assignment.

>> Read more trending news

School staff sparked an investigation after seeing a drawing that included a schoolhouse on fire, a person appearing to hold a gun next to the words “Pew Pew Pew” shooting at a line of people, another person on fire next to the words “AHHH! It burns!” and two people on the ground in what appears to be a pool of blood, the Gulf County Sheriff’s Office said.

>> On PalmBeachPost.com: Florida man revives fish, but still on hook for arrest

Authorities said Robert Paul Alexander Edwards, 33, drew the image and they arrested him Friday, charging him with writing threats to kill or do bodily injury.

>> On PalmBeachPost.com: Mop-wearing Florida man looking for eggs 'terrified entire family'

Gulf County Sheriff Mike Harrison said investigators don’t think Edwards had any plan to follow through on the threat.

Substitute teachers accused of forcing students to crawl on asphalt track as punishment

Police are investigating reports that two substitute teachers at a Texas middle school caused children to injure their hands Thursday by forcing them to crawl on an asphalt track during a physical education class, said Florence Police Chief Adam Marsh.

Charges have not been filed, Marsh told the Austin American-Statesman.

>> Read more trending news

Marsh said he has seen blistering and bruising on the hands of four children, who were in a sixth-grade class at Florence Middle School. He declined to release the names of the two teachers being investigated.

READ: Georgetown preschool teacher accused of slapping 4-year-old

Marsh said two sets of parents filed complaints with the police at 6 p.m. Thursday saying their children were forced to do bear crawls around the track. A bear crawl is done on the hands and feet without the knees touching the ground. The exercise is used for endurance and strength-building, Marsh said.

Police are continuing to investigate the case, which involves many children, he said. They will submit their findings to the Williamson County District Attorney’s office to see if charges should be filed, Marsh said. He said Child Protective Services also is involved in the investigation.

He declined to comment further on the case.

Lisa Block, a spokeswoman for the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services, said the state agency is working with the police to investigate the incident.

One of the parents who filed a complaint with police, Nancy Gonzalez, spoke through an interpreter during a phone interview with the Austin American-Statesman Thursday.

Gonzalez said that when she picked up her 11-year-old daughter from school Thursday, her daughter had bruised hands. Gonzalez said her daughter told her that two substitute teachers forced her and her class to run and do bear crawls for half an hour around an asphalt track as punishment for what another student had done.

Gonzalez said she was “horrified” to see her child’s injuries and went to the school office to talk to someone, but that an official there wouldn’t talk to her.

Florence School District Superintendent Paul Michalewicz said Friday school officials are cooperating with police and also are conducting their own investigation. He declined further comment.

Teacher removed after bragging he failed students who didn’t stand for pledge

A New York state high school teacher has been removed from the classroom by his district after bragging on Facebook last month that he once failed two students because they refused to stand for the Pledge of Allegiance.

Newsday reported that Steven Solomon, a health teacher at Uniondale High School, was reassigned on Nov. 15 after several residents complained to the school board about his social media post. Uniondale is a small community on Long Island. 

“The school district is aware of a teacher posting on social media about a situation involving grades and standing for the Pledge of Allegiance that occurred more than a decade ago,” Uniondale Superintendent William Lloyd said in a statement obtained by Newsday. “The District has taken the proactive measure of assigning this faculty member to out-of-classroom duties until further investigation into the matter can be completed.”

Solomon told New York City’s WABC-TV that the students “failed themselves.”

“They had less than a passing grade, and that, combined with poor behavior, which included -- part of it was they didn’t stand for the pledge, they said they didn’t care if these military people lived or died,” Solomon told the news station.

The longtime teacher said the students disrespected him, themselves and their families. 

“They had many behavioral write-ups. So, it was a combination,” Solomon said. “What am I supposed to do, reward kids with a failing grade who have poor discipline?”

The Facebook comment obtained by WABC-TV showed, however, that Solomon told a friend he ordinarily would have passed the students, despite the failing grades.

“Well, I know God has a sense of humor because both of these unpatriotic kids ended up with a 63 (average), and under ordinary circumstances I would have passed them both,” Solomon wrote. “Instead I failed them both.

“Well, the next year, miraculously, I had them both back in my homeroom class and, when I asked the class to stand, these two suckers were the first up! True story!”

Solomon wrote in the comment that he went against his principal’s orders when he tried to make the teens stand. 

“(The students) went to the principal complaining I couldn’t legally make them stand. The principal told me not to make them stand,” he wrote

The teens were within their legal right to refrain from standing for the Pledge of Allegiance. A 1943 Supreme Court ruling in West Virginia -- West Virginia State Board of Education v. Barnette -- protects students from having to say the pledge in school.

“I told the students standing for the flag was showing respect for the men of the military who risked their lives to protect our freedoms,” Solomon wrote in the Facebook comment. “They said, ‘We didn’t ask them to.’”

Solomon wrote that when the students refused to stand again the following day, he threatened their grades.

“I told them that is true, and that what makes this country great is ‘that I didn’t have to pass them, either,’” he wrote. 

>> Read more trending news

Solomon denied that he failed the students solely because they didn’t stand for the pledge and said he was “goofing off to a friend” when he wrote the post, WABC-TV reported

“I thought this just went to him,” Solomon told the news station. “This person said, ‘Teachers don’t teach respect anymore, don’t have kids stand for the pledge anymore.’ And I said, ‘Wait a minute, that’s not true.’”

He said the students were “not choir kids,” but were teens who said they didn’t care if military members lived or died. 

“I never put down any kid I ever taught,” Solomon said. “I bring kids up. I build the kids up. I regret that that came out. That was meant for one person to read. Not everyone.”

He questioned the district’s decision to remove him from his classroom.

“Because I want kids to have respect and stand for the pledge and have respect for people in this country, they want to try to suspend me and fire me?” Solomon said. “What message does that show?”

Newsday reported that Solomon has taught in the Uniondale district for 30 years. 

Solomon is not the only educator to come under fire in recent months for trying to force students to stand during the pledge. The Midland, Texas, school district found itself facing questions in September after juniors and seniors at Midland High School attended a presentation that included a PowerPoint slide that stated it was the law to stay standing during the pledge

In the weeks following the controversy, Midland Independent School District officials clarified that Texas law requires the inclusion of the pledge and a moment of silence each school day, but stated that the district’s policy has provisions allowing parents to opt their children out of participating. 

Woman faces felony charge after putting recorder in daughter’s backpack to prove bullying

A Virginia woman faces up to five years in prison if she is convicted of putting a digital recorder in her daughter’s backpack to prove the girl was being bullied at school. 

Sarah Sims, of Norfolk, told WAVY-TV that she tried multiple times to contact administrators at Ocean View Elementary School about the bullying her 9-year-old daughter was experiencing. When she got no response, she said, she took the matter into her own hands.

“If I’m not getting an answer from you, what am I left to do?” Sims told the news station.

Sims said she put the recorder in her daughter’s bag with the hope that it would capture audio of what her daughter was dealing with in the classroom. The recorder was discovered by school staff.

The girl was moved to a new classroom and, about a month after the incident, Sims was charged by police, WAVY-TV reported

Sims is charged with the use of a device to intercept oral communications, which is a felony. She is also charged with misdemeanor contributing to the delinquency of a minor.

Norfolk Public Schools has a policy against electronic devices in its elementary schools, the news station reported. 

>> Read more trending news

Sims said she was “mortified” by the charges.

“Next thing I know, I’m a felon,” Sims said. “Felony charges and a misdemeanor when I’m trying to look out for my kid. What do you do?”

Sims’ attorney, Kristin Paulding, told WAVY-TV that the charges were a stretch. 

“They aren’t making this about that classroom. There are charges that carry jail time,” Paulding said. “Instead of comforting her (about the alleged bullying), she’s going to a magistrate and being handcuffed.”

Sims is scheduled for a preliminary hearing in January. In the meantime, the mother said she is most bothered by the lack of response she received on her daughter’s complaints of being bullied.

“I tried to be fair, but it’s not fair,” Sims told WAVY-TV. “There is nothing fair about this.”

Officials with the school district declined to comment on the case, citing the ongoing investigation. 

 

Editorial: Why good teachers quit

Janet Meckstroth Alessi has been an English teacher at John I. Leonard High School in Greenacres, Florida, for nearly 35 years. With more than 3,600 students, John I. Leonard is Palm Beach County’s largest high school.

Five years ago, my friend Sarah and I, who have been Palm Beach County teachers for decades, weren’t even talking about retiring from teaching. Now, she’s planning to retire at the end of this year, and I’m planning to retire within the next four years.

Why? As Sarah says, “The descent of teaching started with testing and the loss of teacher control over curriculum.”

I have been an English teacher at John I. Leonard High School since 1983 ... We have students from more than 20 countries, and there’s no other school at which I would have preferred to teach all these years.

>> Read more trending news

Sarah, who asked that I not use her last name, has been a high school teacher for 31 years, 24 of which have been in Palm Beach County. We met in 1984 when we were taking a graduate course together. She is one of the most intelligent, assiduous people I know.

For most of my career, I’ve loved teaching. I don’t regret having dedicated 34 years of my life to teaching, and it still thrills me when I can make a difference in a student’s life.

However, if I were just starting my career, I’m not sure how long I’d last.

The simple reason: So much testing has diminished true learning.

Unless you are a teacher yourself or have a child in the school system, you’d be shocked by how much teaching-to-tests, practice testing, retake testing and make-up testing occurs.

RELATED: A Judge sentenced a man to write 144 compliments about ex-girlfriend

On a regular basis, gym classes lose access to the gymnasium, and students lose access to the media center due to testing. Nearly every day, teachers receive lists of hundreds of students who need to be sent out for testing.

I find it difficult to even keep up with all of the testing acronyms: FSA (Florida Standards Assessment), EOC (End of Course), USA (United Statewide Assessment), PBPA (Palm Beach Performance Assessment), PSAT (Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test), SAT (Scholastic Assessment Test), ACT (American College Testing), AICE (Advanced International Certificate of Education) and AP (Advanced Placement).

I used to teach magnificent novels such as “To Kill a Mockingbird” and “A Tale of Two Cities.” My students and I read these novels together, while listening to them on tape. We discussed and analyzed what we were reading. Charles Dickens is not easy to read, but most of my students thanked me for making them read “A Tale of Two Cities,” telling me they never would have read and understood it on their own.

Not only did they improve their reading comprehension, vocabulary and even their self-esteem by reading novels, but they also came to know and love memorable characters such as Atticus Finch, Tom Robinson, Madame Defarge and Sydney Carton. And they experienced literary devices such as foreshadowing and conflict in action.

More importantly, they were left with valuable life lessons and role models.

I also used to teach Shakespeare plays such as “Romeo and Juliet,” “Julius Caesar,” “Macbeth” and “Hamlet.” I sewed costumes for my students, who made wooden swords and shields so that they could act out the plays as we read them. They learned about love, hate, revenge, strength, ambition and more.

Sadly, there have been years when English teachers have been instructed to suspend the teaching of novels, Shakespeare and even vocabulary because of standardized testing.

What will students remember about practice SAT, ACT and FSA passages when they’re adults?

I, on the other hand, clearly remember numerous characters and themes from stories that I read in school. These stories have helped shape who I am.

For the first 25 years that I taught, before each grading period, I wrote out my lesson plans for the entire nine weeks. Now, I write them one week at a time, as I often have to “be flexible” and change them, mostly because of standardized testing.

I love to teach. I was hired to teach. Let me teach, damn it!

Another key reason good teachers quit, as my friend Sarah says: “The kids and their parents have increasingly less accountability, and we have more.”

I have 130 students this year. Only three of their parents came to open house. And last school year, the parents of one of my students, who had 51 absences second semester, hired a lawyer and threatened to sue the school board because their son wasn’t graduating.

Instead of teaching students to be responsible, we’re feeding their sense of entitlement.

A couple of years ago, I was assigned to proctor an AP test. Unbelievably, this was a make-up of a make-up of a make-up test, and when one of the two students didn’t show up, I was asked to call her.

We were paying for her to take the test. Did we have to wake her up as well? Where’s the accountability?

When she showed up, she didn’t have a pencil. Why would she? She knew from past experience that one would be provided for her.

When a student is suspended, he or she is now allowed to make up work. Where’s the punishment?

RELATED: Seminole Ridge student deliver backpacks to Acreage Pines Elementary

Students have to pass the FSA in order to graduate. However, if they fail it but receive a high enough score on the SAT or ACT, they can still graduate. Therefore, we spend an inordinate amount of class time trying to improve students’ SAT, ACT and FSA test scores.

Decades ago, following the first grading period of my career, my principal, Luke Thornton, called me into his office and pointed out how many of my students had earned an “F” in my class. He then asked if I thought they deserved an “F.”

“Yes, sir, I do,” I replied, and that was the end of that.

Not surprisingly, when my students discovered that I meant business, their grades improved.

However, today a school’s grade is partly determined by its graduation rate; and the evaluation of teachers, administrators and superintendents is partly based on the success of their students.

Sometimes, teachers are told that they must call the parents of students making a D or F in their class. Rather than do this, some teachers bump the D’s and F’s up to C’s.

Of course, when students learn that they can carry an F all nine weeks, and then it magically transforms into a C, this has a snowball effect and inflates GPAs.

I haven’t bumped grades up, but I do understand why some teachers have. We electronically post grades once a week and send out mid-term progress reports. Shouldn’t that be enough notification?

We’ve also had too many bad experiences. The first parent I called this year, for example, told me that surely there were other students whose behavior was worse than her daughter’s. She then demanded to know why I was picking on her daughter, berated me for bothering her, and hung up.

One father declared, “When my son’s in school, he’s your problem. Don’t ever call me again,” before hanging up on me.

Yes, there are some wonderful, supportive parents and students. Unfortunately, not all parents have taught their children to respect them, let alone respect their teachers. I also believe the blatant disrespect shown by some students in television shows and movies contributes to the problem.

I have always tried to treat my students with respect, and in return, I have usually earned their respect.

However, due to pressure to not suspend students, standards of behavior have been lowered over the years. The result has been that many teachers deal with brazen disrespect on a daily basis and aren’t consistently supported by their administration.

As Sarah points out, “Many students seem to have the attitude of, ‘You have to tolerate me.’ Too often, they’re right.”

A former student of mine, who is in her second year of teaching, laments that she “absolutely hated” her first year of teaching because her third-grade students were “too rude.”

If they’re “too rude” in third grade, imagine what they’re like in middle and high school.

A friend, who’s teaching third grade this year, has a student who has informed her of the different ways he’d like to kill her. He has threatened his classmates with a fork, scissors and belt, and he has told a classmate he wished the classmate had been in Las Vegas and died. My friend has to buzz the office daily and is documenting this student’s behavior, but the red tape involved in having him placed in a classroom for students with an “emotional behavior disorder” is tedious.

As John I. Leonard High’s Dwyer Award winner Jackie Burgess-Malone points out, “We don’t even have time to get to know our students anymore.”

We’re expected to attend Professional Development Days (PDDs), keep up with our Professional Growth Plan (PGP), the Education Data Warehouse (EDW), Individualized Education Programs (IEPs), Temporary Duty Elsewhere (TDE) forms, Wildly Important Goals (WIGs), Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) and our Student Information System (SIS).

We must take attendance, check for dress code, check testing lists for our students’ names, check and respond to email, do our assigned “duty” during our planning period, watch videos and pass quizzes on the videos, earn points to renew our teaching certificate, provide make-up work, call parents, attend meetings, keep up with all of the standardized testing, write lesson plans, create worksheets, tests and quizzes and make copies.

RELATED: Angry teachers say principal’s second change is proof of double standards

That’s in addition to grading papers and entering grades, tardies and absences into the computer.

And, oh, yes, we teach.

When I am able to teach, I would like to be given credit for having a Master’s degree in English, having 34 years of experience, and having some idea of what’s best for my students, thank you very much.

Yet, almost every year, we’re introduced to a new teaching method. Many of us wonder if those deciding how we should teach were ever teachers themselves, and if so, how long it’s been since they were in a classroom.

(There are definitely some teachers who are stuck in their ways and refuse to change. I may not embrace change, but I am willing to change. When I’m presented with a new teaching method, I try it out, but if it’s not effective, I employ it only enough to keep my job.)

Class size is a problem as well. I thought having 34 students in one of my classes was a lot, but we have an anatomy and physiology class with 39. And I recently spoke to a physical education teacher who’s grateful that the class count for her classes is in the 50s, unlike in previous years, when it’s been in the 70s.

We also have so many people using the restroom between classes that we frequently struggle to have enough water pressure to flush the toilets and wash our hands, and the air conditioning breaks down too frequently — try taking all those tests in a 90-degree room.

What’s more, there are tests for teachers — and many are failing.

In addition to earning a bachelor’s degree, teachers must pass the Florida Teacher Certification Exam. Teachers who haven’t passed this exam can teach with a temporary teaching certificate for three years; however, the certificate is non-renewable.

Two years ago, the Florida Department of Education introduced more difficult teacher certification exams. Since then, the failure rates have increased by as much as 30 percent on some sections. Since 2015, only 69 percent of teachers have passed the essay, 65 percent have passed the English language skills exam, 60 percent have passed the reading exam and 57 percent have passed the math exam.

Could our teachers fresh out of college be struggling to pass this exam because they were given passing grades when they shouldn’t have been? Were they programmed to care more about their grades than learning? Were their teachers too busy teaching to the standardized test-of-the-day to teach general knowledge? Does the exam contain poorly worded, ambiguous and/or unnecessarily rigorous questions?

Or is the answer none of the above, some combination of the above, or all of the above?

On the first day of school each year, I ask my seniors if they can name the eight parts of speech. Only one or two students in the last decade have been able to do so.

I am writing this not to complain — but to plainly state what teachers have to go through each day. We teachers want our students to be excited about learning.

My hope is that our governor, superintendent, parents, teachers, students and our community will address these problems and that our new teachers will stay because they will see that improvements are being made.

Teaching can and should be one of the most rewarding careers a person can choose.

Read the full piece at the Palm Beach Post.

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